NIST, Hyperspectral Imaging Standards, and Alternative Methods of Sensor Evaluation

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Hyperspectral imaging continues to expand into new applications providing improved remote detection, identification, and quantification. Ensuring consistent and accurate results will likely become a greater priority as the field advances from demonstrations to use as a routine operational tool. While a significant amount of knowledge can be leveraged from established radiometric calibration practices, hyperspectral imaging poses some unique challenges. This talk will discuss current NIST programs and plans to address application-specific challenges (e.g., the NIST FOREST Project).



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  • Rochester Institute of Technolgoy, Center for Imaging Science
  • 54 Lomb Memorial Drive
  • Rochester, New York
  • United States 14623
  • Building: 76
  • Room Number: 1125 (Auditorium)
  • Click here for Map

Staticmap?size=250x200&sensor=false&zoom=14&markers=43.08337%2c 77


  Speakers

David W. Allen
David W. Allen of National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

Topic:

NIST, Hyperspectral Imaging Standards, and Alternative Methods of Sensor Evaluation

Hyperspectral imaging continues to expand into new applications providing improved remote detection, identification, and quantification. Ensuring consistent and accurate results will likely become a greater priority as the field advances from demonstrations to use as a routine operational tool. While a significant amount of knowledge can be leveraged from established radiometric calibration practices, hyperspectral imaging poses some unique challenges. This talk will discuss current NIST programs and plans to address application-specific challenges.

Biography:

David Allen has been working at NIST for over 20 years. Current research interests include advancing hyperspectral imaging for critical applications related to medicine, defense, and the environment. This effort encompasses the development of end-to-end analysis methodology that integrates standards and best practices for hyperspectral imager performance metrics. Recent work has focused on the collection of spectral signatures and the examination of their inherent variability. Earlier work included establishing, maintaining and improving national scales of reflectance and transmittance in the NIST spectrophotometry program.

He is a member of the Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE), American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (ASPRS), the Council for the Optical Radiation Measurements (CORM), and the American Geophysical Union (AGU).

He has been awarded the NIST Bronze Medal in 2011, NASA Customer Service Excellence Award in 2002, Hood College Leah B. Allen Astronomy Award in 1996.

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Address:100 Bureau Drive, , Gaithersburg, Maryland, United States, 20899