Epitaxial 3C-SiC nano thin films: A versatile material for MEMS/NEMS applications

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Abstract:

Silicon has been the leading semiconductor in Micro Electromechanical Systems (MEMS), where its applications can be found in numerous ubiquitous devices, including smart phone and personal computers. Nevertheless, when it comes to high temperature, high corrosion, and long term stability (e.g. implanted electronics), Si cannot withstand such critical conditions. Owing to its wide energy band gap, excellent optical and mechanical properties, silicon carbide has emerged as a promising alternative of Si for MEMS devices operated in harsh environments. In this talk, I will present our recent studies on the epitaxial growth of high quality single crystal cubic silicon carbide (3C-SiC) on a silicon wafer and its micro/nanomachining technologies at the Queensland Micro & Nanotechnology Centre, Griffith University. The physical properties of the as-deposited films such as piezoresistive effect for strain sensing, thermal resistive effect, and residual stress for sensing applications will also be discussed [1-5]. Finally, I will enclose my talk with a brief overview of SiC micro/nano devices such as strain sensors, temperature sensors, and electrochemical sensors, as well as its potential for the next generation of MEMS devices for harsh environments, energy harvesting and bio applications.



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  • Macquarie University
  • Sydney, New South Wales
  • Australia 2109
  • Building: E6B

Staticmap?size=250x200&sensor=false&zoom=14&markers= 33.7774154%2c151
  • Co-sponsored by Mohsen.Asadniya@mq.edu.au


  Speakers

Dr. Hoang-Phuong Phan Queensland Micro and Nanotechnology Centre, Griffith University, Qld, Australia

Topic:

Epitaxial 3C-SiC nano thin films: A versatile material for MEMS/NEMS applications

Silicon has been the leading semiconductor in Micro Electromechanical Systems (MEMS), where its applications can be found in numerous ubiquitous devices, including smart phone and personal computers. Nevertheless, when it comes to high temperature, high corrosion, and long term stability (e.g. implanted electronics), Si cannot withstand such critical conditions. Owing to its wide energy band gap, excellent optical and mechanical properties, silicon carbide has emerged as a promising alternative of Si for MEMS devices operated in harsh environments. In this talk, I will present our recent studies on the epitaxial growth of high quality single crystal cubic silicon carbide (3C-SiC) on a silicon wafer and its micro/nanomachining technologies at the Queensland Micro & Nanotechnology Centre, Griffith University. The physical properties of the as-deposited films such as piezoresistive effect for strain sensing, thermal resistive effect, and residual stress for sensing applications will also be discussed [1-5]. Finally, I will enclose my talk with a brief overview of SiC micro/nano devices such as strain sensors, temperature sensors, and electrochemical sensors, as well as its potential for the next generation of MEMS devices for harsh environments, energy harvesting and bio applications.

Biography:

Dr.  Hoang-Phuong Phan (B.E & M.E. The University of Tokyo; Ph.D Griffith University) is  a  research  fellow  at  the  QMNC, Griffith University,  where  his  main  interests  focus  on  silicon carbide  MEMS/NEMS  for  applications  in  harsh  environments.  He has also been a visiting scholar at the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Japan in 2016, and Stanford University, US in 2017.  Dr.  Phan  has published  more than 60  peer-reviewed  journal articles,  two  US  patents,  and two book/book chapter, all  in  micro  and  nanotechnologies.  He was the recipient of the Japanese Government Scholarships (MEXT) for undergraduate and postgraduate studies (2006-2013), and the GUPRS and GUIPRS scholarships from Griffith University for the doctoral course (2013-2016). Dr. Phan was honoured with the GU publication award, the GU Postdoctoral Fellowship, the Springer outstanding theses award, and the Australian Nanotechnology Network Oversea Fellowship. He was also selected to the Australian delegates in the 23rd World Micromachines Summit in Barcelona, Spain in 2017. Dr.  Phan  has  served  as  a  reviewer  for  several  journals,  including  JMEMS, Sens. Actuators A, Micromachines, J. Appl. Phys., IEEE Sensors J., Electron  Dev. Letts., and Appl. Phys. Lett.