A New Paradigm in Human Health – Gas Sensing Capsule

Share

Ingestible sensors have been hailed as the next influential tools for monitoring human health and providing the impact of food on human. Prof Kalantar-zadeh and his group have developed a novel low-cost and non-invasive medical device called human gas sensing capsule which has applications in diagnostics of gastrointestinal disorders and assessing dietary effects on the gut. The product is a capsule size indigestible electronic device that leaves the body after normal bowel transient. The capsule consists of gas sensors, micro-electronic circuits, small-sized harmless batteries and telecommunication components. This capsule allows accurate measurement of the concentrations four vital gases of O2, H2, CO2 and CH4 and also temperature. Intestinal gas profiles are then transmitted to an external small handheld device that communicates with a smart-phone for real-time data display and analysis. Animal and the first phase of human trials have been successfully finished. The outcomes of these trials will be presented in the talk. These outcomes show some extraordinary phenomena that can potentially revolutionize fields of gastroenterology and food sciences.

 Kourosh Kalantar-zadeh (born in November 1971) is an Australian scientist involved in research in the fields of materials sciences, electronics, and transducers. He is best known for his works on two-dimensional semiconductors, ingestible sensors and liquid metals. He and his group are the inventors of the first ingestible chemical sensor, human gas sensing capsule.



  Date and Time

  Location

  Contact

  Registration



  • Macquarie University
  • Sydney, Australian Capital Territory
  • Australia 2109
  • Building: E6B 149, 7 WW
  • Subhas.Mukhopadhyay@mq.edu.au

  • Co-sponsored by Prof. Subhas Mukhopadhyay


  Speakers

Prof. Kourosh Kalantar-zadeh

Topic:

A New Paradigm in Human Health – Gas Sensing Capsule

Ingestible sensors have been hailed as the next influential tools for monitoring human health and providing the impact of food on human. Prof Kalantar-zadeh and his group have developed a novel low-cost and non-invasive medical device called human gas sensing capsule which has applications in diagnostics of gastrointestinal disorders and assessing dietary effects on the gut. The product is a capsule size indigestible electronic device that leaves the body after normal bowel transient. The capsule consists of gas sensors, micro-electronic circuits, small-sized harmless batteries and telecommunication components. This capsule allows accurate measurement of the concentrations four vital gases of O2, H2, CO2 and CH4 and also temperature. Intestinal gas profiles are then transmitted to an external small handheld device that communicates with a smart-phone for real-time data display and analysis. Animal and the first phase of human trials have been successfully finished. The outcomes of these trials will be presented in the talk. These outcomes show some extraordinary phenomena that can potentially revolutionize fields of gastroenterology and food sciences.

 Kourosh Kalantar-zadeh (born in November 1971) is an Australian scientist involved in research in the fields of materials sciences, electronics, and transducers. He is best known for his works on two-dimensional semiconductors, ingestible sensors and liquid metals. He and his group are the inventors of the first ingestible chemical sensor, human gas sensing capsule.

Biography:

Kourosh Kalantar-zadeh is a 2018 Australian Research Council (ARC) Laureate Fellow and a newly appointed Professor of Chemical Engineering at UNSW, in Sydney. Formerly, he was a Distinguished Professor of electronic engineering at RMIT in Melbourne. He is also an adjunct Professor at Sichuan University, China.

Kalantar-zadeh has co-authored nearly 400 research articles and reviews, which have been cited >23,000 times, giving him an h-index of over 72 according to Google Scholar (ref Oct 2018). In addition, Kalantar-zadeh is a member of the editorial boards of Applied Materials Today, ACS Applied Nano Materials, ACS Sensors, Advanced Materials Technologies and Nano-Micro Letters. He will also join the editorial board of ACS Nano from 2019.

Kalantar-zadeh is internationally recognised for his work on sensors and liquid metals and has been awarded the 2017 IEEE Sensor Council Achievement Award and 2018 ACS Advances in Measurement Science Lectureship Award (Asia-Pacific region). He is also a Chief Investigator within the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence in Future Low-Energy Electronics Technologies (FLEET) developing nanofabrication methods and 2D/novel materials for future electronics.

Email: