IEEE OC Computer Soc. Presentation Mtg.: "Parallel Agile--Breaking Brooks' Law?"

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Abstract

High performance computing strategies typically leverage parallel processing to reduce compute time.  Yet parallelism in software engineering is not typically employed in a similar fashion.  One reason for this is Brooks' Law, which states that it's impossible to accelerate a software project in proportion to the number of developers on the team.   Brooks' Law stands in the way of large-scale parallel software engineering like Einstein's speed-of-light speed limit held back intergalactic travel until the invention of the warp drive by Zefram Cohrane in 2063.

Brooks' Law was postulated in the last millennium, before the advent of REST APIs, NoSQL databases, Domain Driven Design, Executable UML, and most importantly - Codebots™.   It's generally regarded as an absolute truth, which leads to agile development methods with small teams of developers proceeding incrementally in a never-ending series of short sprints, often leaving mountains of technical debt in their wake.

Parallel Agile seeks to find a loophole in Brooks' Law by enabling elastic staffing.  Elastic staffing lets you add developers to your project much like Amazon adds servers to your "elastic-cloud" hosting solution.   Elastic staffing is enabled by executable architecture - a "space-folding" advance in software process that lets a large team start prototyping against a cloud database and REST API at the very start of your project.   Executable architectures are generated by a Codebot™.  Learn the rest in person...

Speaker

Doug Rosenberg (Doug@ParallelAgile.com) is the founder and CTO of Parallel Agile, Inc., www.ParallelAgile.com   Doug has more than 30 years of experience in software engineering, including being CEO of ICONIX Software Engineering between 1986 and 2016.  Since 2010 he has been consulting and/or volunteering with the USC's Center for Systems and Software Engineerig.

Doug is the author of three books on UML, three on Agile Development, one on Design Driven Testing, and two related to software processes:

     (1995) Use Case Driven Object Modeling with UML – A Practical Approach
     (2001) Applying Use Case Driven Object Modeling with UML
     
(2003) eXtreme Programming Refactored – The case against XP
     
(2005) Agile Development with ICONIX Process – People, Process, and Pragmatism
     
(2007) Use Case Driven Object Modeling with UML – Theory and Practice
     
(2010) Design Driven Testing – Test Smarter, Not Harder,
     
(2011) ICONIX Process Roadmaps
     
(2019) Parallel Agile – Faster Delivery, Fewer Defects, Lower Cost (in progress)

Venue

This meeting will be at the Knobbe Martens' Irvine offices. Visitor parking validation will be provided to attendees upon arrival by building receptionist.
 
Dinner (not free)
 
Subway sandwiches, Chips and Soda.
 


  Date and Time

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  • Knobbe Martens
  • 2040 Main Street
  • Irvine, California
  • United States 92614
  • Room Number: 2nd Floor Room 275West
  • Click here for Map
  • Starts 16 March 2019 01:00 PM
  • Ends 24 March 2019 11:59 PM
  • All times are US/Pacific
  • Admission fee (optional) ?
  • Register






Agenda

6:15 PM Doors Open: Dinner (optional)
6:30 PM Networking
7:00 PM Announcements and Presentation
8:00 PM Meeting Adjourned