IEEE SA LM chapter: The NS32016-based Syte 400 workstation

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A talk about the 1981 Syte 400 workstation, and bring what is almost certainly the sole surviving unit to the meeting.  Have reviewed some of the surviving project documentation, and will discuss both the technology convergence that led to the decade where computer system innovation was led by engineering workstations, and how the Syte architecture is actually less typical of those workstations and more of a precursor to the muti-core CPUs and hypervisor-controlled virtualization that dominates the server landscape today.  



  Date and Time

  Location

  Contact

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  • 8633 Crownhill Blvd
  • San Antonio, Texas
  • United States 78209
  • Building: La Fonda
  • Room Number: back room

Staticmap?size=250x200&sensor=false&zoom=14&markers=29.515017%2c 98
  • Starts 16 August 2019 07:04 PM
  • Ends 19 September 2019 10:00 AM
  • All times are US/Central
  • No Admission Charge


  Speakers

Michael Fischer

Topic:

The NS32016-based Syte 400 workstation

A talk about the Syte 400 workstation, and bring what is almost certainly the sole surviving unit to the meeting.  Have reviewed some of the surviving project documentation, and am prepared to discuss both the technology convergence that led to the decade where computer system innovation was led by engineering workstations, and how the Syte architecture is actually less typical of those workstations and more of a precursor to the muti-core CPUs and hypervisor-controlled virtualization that dominates the server landscape today.  

Biography:

Architect and lead developer of the NS32016-based Syte 400 workstation.  My work at Datapoint was the creation of Wi-Fi.  Contributed to WLAN development and standardization.  Joined the IEEE 802.11 WLAN standards working group in 1992, and am the literal author of more than half the material in the original 802.11 standard, 802.11b (which is the basis for Wi-Fi), and 802.11e (which is the MAC protocol in Wi-Fi n and Wi-Fi ac).  Defined the architecture and led the implementation of the controller chip used in essentially all of the first 100 million Wi-Fi devices -- if it was Wi-Fi certified before 2003.  Designed the world's first single-chip LTE controller for cell phone handsets, I returned to IEEE 802.11, and am now active in Task Group bd, developing the next-generation V2X protocol for future cars (and trains, and, perhaps, drones).