IEEE Distinguished Lecturer **change of time to 3:30pm** - Advanced optical sources for spectrally efficient photonic systems

Share

The continuing growth in demand for bandwidth (from residential and business users), necessitates significant research into new advanced technologies that will be employed in future broadband communication systems. Two specific technologies which are becoming increasingly important for future photonic systems are wavelength tunable lasers and optical frequency combs. Although these topics have been studied for over two decades their significance for the development of future ultra-high capacity photonic systems has only recently been fully understood. Wavelength tunable lasers are currently becoming the norm in optical communication systems because of their flexibility and ability to work on any wavelength. However, as their operating principles are different to standard single mode lasers they can effect how future systems will operate. For example as optical transmission systems move towards more coherent transmission (where the data is carried using both the intensity and phase of the optical carrier), the phase noise in these tunable lasers will become increasingly important. Optical frequency combs also have many applications for future photonics systems, and for telecommunications they can be used to obtain the highest spectral efficiency in optical transmission systems by employing the technology of optical frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) that has been widely employed to increase spectral efficiency in wireless systems. Wavelength tunable lasers and optical frequency combs are thus topics at the leading edge of current photonics systems research, and their detailed understanding promises new applications in all-optical signal processing, optical sensing and metrology, and specifically telecommunications. This talk will focus on the development and characterization of various wavelength tunable lasers and optical frequency combs, and then outline how these sources can be employed for developing optical transmission systems and networks which make the best use of available optical spectrum.



  Date and Time

  Location

  Contact

  Registration



  • 3480 University Street
  • Montreal, Quebec
  • Canada H3A0E9
  • Building: McConnell Engineering Building
  • Room Number: Room MC603
  • Click here for Map
  • Survey: Fill out the survey
  • Starts 05 September 2019 09:10 AM
  • Ends 11 October 2019 01:10 PM
  • All times are Canada/Eastern
  • No Admission Charge
  • Register


  Speakers

Prof. Liam Barry

Prof. Liam Barry of School of Electronic Engineering, Dublin City University

Topic:

Advanced optical sources for spectrally efficient photonic systems

The continuing growth in demand for bandwidth (from residential and business users), necessitates significant research into new advanced technologies that will be employed in future broadband communication systems. Two specific technologies which are becoming increasingly important for future photonic systems are wavelength tunable lasers and optical frequency combs. Although these topics have been studied for over two decades their significance for the development of future ultra-high capacity photonic systems has only recently been fully understood. Wavelength tunable lasers are currently becoming the norm in optical communication systems because of their flexibility and ability to work on any wavelength. However, as their operating principles are different to standard single mode lasers they can effect how future systems will operate. For example as optical transmission systems move towards more coherent transmission (where the data is carried using both the intensity and phase of the optical carrier), the phase noise in these tunable lasers will become increasingly important. Optical frequency combs also have many applications for future photonics systems, and for telecommunications they can be used to obtain the highest spectral efficiency in optical transmission systems by employing the technology of optical frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) that has been widely employed to increase spectral efficiency in wireless systems. Wavelength tunable lasers and optical frequency combs are thus topics at the leading edge of current photonics systems research, and their detailed understanding promises new applications in all-optical signal processing, optical sensing and metrology, and specifically telecommunications. This talk will focus on the development and characterization of various wavelength tunable lasers and optical frequency combs, and then outline how these sources can be employed for developing optical transmission systems and networks which make the best use of available optical spectrum.

Biography:

Liam Barry received his BE (Electronic Engineering) and MengSc (Optical Communications) degrees from University College Dublin in 1991 and 1993 respectively. From February 1993 until January 1996 he was employed as a Research Engineer in the Optical Systems Department of France Telecom’s Research Laboratories (now known as Orange Labs) in Lannion, France. During this period his research involved the use of ultra short optical pulses in high capacity optical networks, and as a result of this work he obtained his PhD Degree from the University of Rennes in France. In February 1996 he joined the Applied Optics Centre in Auckland University, New Zealand, as a Research Fellow and in March 1998 he took up a lecturing position in the School of Electronic Engineering at Dublin City University, and established the Radio and Optical Communications Laboratory. He is currently a Full Professor in the School of Electronic Engineering and a Principal Investigator for Science Foundation Ireland.  His main research interests are; all-optical signal processing, optical pulse generation and characterization, hybrid radio/fibre communication systems, wavelength tuneable lasers for reconfigurable optical networks, and optical performance monitoring. He has published over 500 articles in internationally peer reviewed journals and conferences, holds 9 patents in the area of optoelectronics, has co-founded two companies in the photonics sector, and has supervised 34 research graduate students to completion (27 at PhD level and 7 at Masters level). He was a TPC member for the European Conference on Optical Communications (ECOC) from 2004 to 2016 and will serve as conference co-chair for ECOC in Dublin in 2019. He also served as a TPC member for the Optical Fibre Communication Conference (OFC) from 2007 to 2010, serving as Chair of the Optoelectronic Device Strand in 210. He is currently an Associate Editor for IEEE Photonics Journal and IEEE/OSA Journal of Optical Communications and Networks.

Email:

Address:Dublin City, Ireland