EMC Distinguished Lecture: The Lightning Phenomenon

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Lightning is one of the primary causes of damage and malfunction of telecommunication and power networks and one of the leading causes of weather-related deaths and injuries.
Lightning is composed of numerous physical processes, of which only a few are visible to the naked eye.
This lecture presents various aspects of the lightning phenomenon, its main processes and the technologies that have been developed to assess the parameters that are important for engineering and scientific applications. These parameters include the channel-base current and its associated
electromagnetic fields.
The measurement techniques for these parameters are intrinsically difficult due to the randomness of the phenomenon and to the harsh electromagnetic environment created by the lightning itself. Besides the measurement of the lightning parameters, warning and insurance applications require the real-time detection and location of the lightning strike point. The main classical and emerging lightning detection and location techniques, including those used in currently available commercial lightning location systems will be described in the lecture. The newly proposed Electromagnetic Time Reversal technique, which has the potential to revolutionize lightning location will also be presented.



  Date and Time

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  • McGill University
  • 3480 University Street
  • Montreal, Quebec
  • Canada H3A0E9
  • Building: McConnell Engineering Building
  • Room Number: 603
  • Click here for Map
  • Co-sponsored by STARaCom Research Network
  • Starts 10 October 2019 10:32 AM
  • Ends 22 October 2019 08:30 PM
  • All times are America/Montreal
  • No Admission Charge
  • Register


  Speakers

Marcos Rubenstein
Marcos Rubenstein

Biography:

Marcos Rubinstein received the Master’s and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from the University of Florida, Gainesville. 

In the decade of the 1990’s, he worked as a research engineer at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Lausanne and as a program manager at Swisscom in the areas of electromagnetic compatibility and lightning. Since 2001, he is a professor at the University of Applied Sciences of Western Switzerland HES-SO, Yverdon-les-Bains, where he is currently responsible for the advanced Communication Technologies Group. He is the author or coauthor of 300 scientific publications in reviewed journals and international conferences. He is also the coauthor of nine book chapters and the co-editor of a book on time reversal. He served as the Editor-in-Chief of the Open Atmospheric Science Journal, and currently serves as an Associate Editor of the IEEE Transactions on EMC.

Prof. Rubinstein received the best Master’s Thesis award from the University of Florida, the IEEE achievement award and he is a co-recipient of the NASA’s Recognition for Innovative Technological Work award. He also received the ICLP Karl Berger award. He is a Fellow of the IEEE and an EMP Fellow, a member of the Swiss Academy of Sciences and of the International Union of Radio Science.