Inaugural Ceremony of the IEEE NSW Sensors Council Chapter

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Inaugural Ceremony of the IEEE NSW Sensors Council Chapter

December 4, 201, 2:0pm to 4:30pm

Venue: E7A 801 (12 WW), Macquarie University, North Ryde

 

Contact: Prof. Subhas Mukhopadhyay, Macquarie University, Subhas.Mukhopadhyay@mq.edu.au

 

Programme:

2:0PM: Welcome

2:10PM: Executive Committee Announcement

2:20pm: Introduction of IEEE Sensors Journal and publication of paper by Prof. Subhas Mukhopadhyay

3:0pm: DL talk by Prof. Veena Misra

4:0pm: Networking

 

Abstract: According to IEEE Member Matthias Reumann, a postdoctoral Fellow at the IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center in Yorktown Heights, “Writing requires discipline, organization, thoroughness, understanding of the background and consequences, and planning,” This seminar will introduce IEEE Sensors Journal as one of the most important platform and present some ground rules on publishing a good scientific paper in the journal. Personal experience with the association with IEEE SJ over 17 years,  as an associate editor (11+ years and TE as 6+ years will be shared.

Biography: Subhas is working as a Professor of Mechanical/Electronics Engineering, Macquarie University, Australia and is the Discipline Leader of the Mechatronics Engineering Degree Programme. His fields of interest include Smart Sensors and sensing technology, instrumentation techniques, wireless sensors and network (WSN) and Internet of Things (IoT). He has supervised over 40 postgraduate students and over 100 Honours students. He has examined over 50 postgraduate theses.

He has published over 400 papers in different international journals and conference proceedings, written nine books and forty two book chapters and edited seventeen conference proceedings. He has also edited thirty-five books with Springer-Verlag and twenty five journal special issues. He has organized over 20 international conferences as either General Chairs/co-chairs or Technical Programme Chair. He has delivered 347 presentations including keynote, invited, tutorial and special lectures.

He is a Fellow of IEEE (USA), a Fellow of IET (UK), a Fellow of IETE (India). He is a Topical Editor of IEEE Sensors journal where he handles 11 Associate Editors. He is also an associate editor of IEEE Transactions on Instrumentation and Measurements. He is a Distinguished Lecturer of the IEEE Sensors Council from 2017 to 2019. He is the Founding chair the IEEE Sensors Council NSW chapter

More details can be available at http://web.science.mq.edu.au/directory/listing/person.htm?id=smukhopa

 

DL title: Self-Powered Wearable Sensors for Health and Environmental Monitoring

Abstract: Health care spending continues to rise globally and the costs in U.S. now exceed any other industrialized country. Since chronic diseases makeup majority of the health care costs, a disruptive solution to address the health care challenge is to empower users and providers with technologies that provide personal health status and inform patients and doctors with better choices while also enabling rapid and effective treatment. The hassle-free and battery-free features of wearable sensors devices can not onlyincrease adoption and compliance but also enable long-term and continuous monitoring of many key health and environmental parameters. As an example, continuous monitoring of data can provide doctors with trends in physiological data leading up to a traumatic event, making treatment and medication regimes significantly more rapid and effective, and providing feedback to doctors on efficacy of prescribed medications and long-term physical response. Recent advances in nanomaterials, nanostructures, and nanodevices have increased efficiency of energy harvesters, lowered energy per computational bit, increased capacitor storage density, and enhanced nanosensor efficiency making autonomous operation realizable. In this talk, I will how these advances are being combined together to build self-powered wearable sensor systems, which can enable long-term sensing and effective management of chronic conditions, sensing of personal exposure to air pollutants and toxins and provide longitudinal studies that can provide new insight into correlation of various health and environmental parameters. Such sensor systems can empower patients and providers to manage wellness instead of managing illness, assist in effective treatment of at-risk elderly, reinforce healthy lifestyles, and provide new tools for long-term environmental exposure health studies. In order to achieve self-powered operation, it is essential to maximize the power generated from the body and minimize the power consumed by sensors, computation, communication and power management to achieve the self-powered operation. Recent advances in nanomaterials, nanostructures, and nanodevices have increased efficiency of energy harvesters, lowered energy per computational bit, increased capacitor storage density, and enhanced nanosensor efficiency making a self-powered system finally realizable. To address these needs effectively, the ASSIST Center has focused on engineered systems-level approach where the system levels needs drive all the research. I will discuss the challenges in technology development, including energy harvesting, ultra low power radios and durability, needed to realize these sensor systems and explore the role that data will play in making these systems effective for both the patient and the provider.

 

Biography: Veena Misra is the Director of the National Science Foundation Nanosystems Engineering Research Center on Advanced Self-Powered Systems of Integrated Sensors and Technologies (ASSIST). She is a Distinguished Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at North Carolina State University and also an IEEE Fellow. She is also 2018-2020 IEEE Distinguished Seminar Speaker. She received the B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from North Carolina State University, Raleigh. After working at the Advanced Products Research and Development Laboratories, Motorola Inc., Austin, TX she joined the faculty of North Carolina State University in 1998. She has authored or coauthored over 150 papers in the areas of state-of-the-art low-power CMOS devices, power devices, alternative high-mobility substrates, nanoscale magnetics, and energy-harvesting. Dr. Misra was the recipient of the 2017 R.J. Reynolds Award for Excellence in Research and Teaching, 2001 National Science Foundation Presidential Early CAREER Award, the 2011 Alcoa Distinguished Engineering Research Award, and 2007 Outstanding Alumni Research Award. She also served as the general chair of the 2012 IEEE International Electron Device Meeting.



  Date and Time

  Location

  Contact

  Registration



  • Macquarie University
  • North Ryde
  • Sydney, New South Wales
  • Australia 2109
  • Building: E7A 801
  • Room Number: 801

Staticmap?size=250x200&sensor=false&zoom=14&markers= 33.77741365%2c151
  • Co-sponsored by Prof. Subhas Mukhopadhyay


  Speakers

Prof. Veena Misra

Topic:

DL title: Self-Powered Wearable Sensors for Health and Environmental Monitoring

Abstract: Health care spending continues to rise globally and the costs in U.S. now exceed any other industrialized country. Since chronic diseases makeup majority of the health care costs, a disruptive solution to address the health care challenge is to empower users and providers with technologies that provide personal health status and inform patients and doctors with better choices while also enabling rapid and effective treatment. The hassle-free and battery-free features of wearable sensors devices can not onlyincrease adoption and compliance but also enable long-term and continuous monitoring of many key health and environmental parameters. As an example, continuous monitoring of data can provide doctors with trends in physiological data leading up to a traumatic event, making treatment and medication regimes significantly more rapid and effective, and providing feedback to doctors on efficacy of prescribed medications and long-term physical response. Recent advances in nanomaterials, nanostructures, and nanodevices have increased efficiency of energy harvesters, lowered energy per computational bit, increased capacitor storage density, and enhanced nanosensor efficiency making autonomous operation realizable. In this talk, I will how these advances are being combined together to build self-powered wearable sensor systems, which can enable long-term sensing and effective management of chronic conditions, sensing of personal exposure to air pollutants and toxins and provide longitudinal studies that can provide new insight into correlation of various health and environmental parameters. Such sensor systems can empower patients and providers to manage wellness instead of managing illness, assist in effective treatment of at-risk elderly, reinforce healthy lifestyles, and provide new tools for long-term environmental exposure health studies. In order to achieve self-powered operation, it is essential to maximize the power generated from the body and minimize the power consumed by sensors, computation, communication and power management to achieve the self-powered operation. Recent advances in nanomaterials, nanostructures, and nanodevices have increased efficiency of energy harvesters, lowered energy per computational bit, increased capacitor storage density, and enhanced nanosensor efficiency making a self-powered system finally realizable. To address these needs effectively, the ASSIST Center has focused on engineered systems-level approach where the system levels needs drive all the research. I will discuss the challenges in technology development, including energy harvesting, ultra low power radios and durability, needed to realize these sensor systems and explore the role that data will play in making these systems effective for both the patient and the provider.

Biography:

Biography: Veena Misra is the Director of the National Science Foundation Nanosystems Engineering Research Center on Advanced Self-Powered Systems of Integrated Sensors and Technologies (ASSIST). She is a Distinguished Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at North Carolina State University and also an IEEE Fellow. She is also 2018-2020 IEEE Distinguished Seminar Speaker. She received the B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from North Carolina State University, Raleigh. After working at the Advanced Products Research and Development Laboratories, Motorola Inc., Austin, TX she joined the faculty of North Carolina State University in 1998. She has authored or coauthored over 150 papers in the areas of state-of-the-art low-power CMOS devices, power devices, alternative high-mobility substrates, nanoscale magnetics, and energy-harvesting. Dr. Misra was the recipient of the 2017 R.J. Reynolds Award for Excellence in Research and Teaching, 2001 National Science Foundation Presidential Early CAREER Award, the 2011 Alcoa Distinguished Engineering Research Award, and 2007 Outstanding Alumni Research Award. She also served as the general chair of the 2012 IEEE International Electron Device Meeting.

Prof. Subhas Mukhopadhyay of Macquarie University

Topic:

Introduction of IEEE Sensors Journal and publication of paper by Prof. Subhas Mukhopadhyay

Abstract: According to IEEE Member Matthias Reumann, a postdoctoral Fellow at the IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center in Yorktown Heights, “Writing requires discipline, organization, thoroughness, understanding of the background and consequences, and planning,” This seminar will introduce IEEE Sensors Journal as one of the most important platform and present some ground rules on publishing a good scientific paper in the journal. Personal experience with the association with IEEE SJ over 17 years,  as an associate editor (11+ years and TE as 6+ years will be shared.

Biography:

Biography: Subhas is working as a Professor of Mechanical/Electronics Engineering, Macquarie University, Australia and is the Discipline Leader of the Mechatronics Engineering Degree Programme. His fields of interest include Smart Sensors and sensing technology, instrumentation techniques, wireless sensors and network (WSN) and Internet of Things (IoT). He has supervised over 40 postgraduate students and over 100 Honours students. He has examined over 50 postgraduate theses.

He has published over 400 papers in different international journals and conference proceedings, written nine books and forty two book chapters and edited seventeen conference proceedings. He has also edited thirty-five books with Springer-Verlag and twenty five journal special issues. He has organized over 20 international conferences as either General Chairs/co-chairs or Technical Programme Chair. He has delivered 347 presentations including keynote, invited, tutorial and special lectures.

He is a Fellow of IEEE (USA), a Fellow of IET (UK), a Fellow of IETE (India). He is a Topical Editor of IEEE Sensors journal where he handles 11 Associate Editors. He is also an associate editor of IEEE Transactions on Instrumentation and Measurements. He is a Distinguished Lecturer of the IEEE Sensors Council from 2017 to 2019. He is the Founding chair the IEEE Sensors Council NSW chapter

More details can be available at http://web.science.mq.edu.au/directory/listing/person.htm?id=smukhopa