What’s All This Software Defined Radio Stuff, Anyhow?

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What’s All This Software Defined Radio Stuff, Anyhow?

The software defined radio (SDR) is the modern evolution of the hardware approach to radio communications that had dominated recent technology. Discrete components formerly implemented tuned circuits, amplifiers, oscillators, mixers and detectors to provide analog modulation and demodulation. Even though vacuum tube electronics gave way to transistors and integrated circuits, the components of the radio remained discrete. However, the advent of digital modulation and application specific integrated circuits has resulted in an SDR in which all but the front end of the receiver and the back end of the transmitter could be accomplished with digital signal processing software.

This talk will discuss the progression of the configuration and the availability of inexpensive SDRs that, while only capable of reception, can still provide a technical advocation and enhance STEM outreach. More modest SDRs with improved performance can facilitate such advanced applications as the reception of commercial and amateur radio satellites.  

 



  Date and Time

  Location

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  • Date: 21 Jun 2022
  • Time: 07:00 PM to 08:00 PM
  • All times are (GMT-05:00) US/Eastern
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Webinar link and password will be emailed after Noon on the day of the meeting. Please whitelist ieee@gpamg.org to make sure you receive the email.

  • Starts 18 May 2022 10:08 AM
  • Ends 21 June 2022 12:00 PM
  • All times are (GMT-05:00) US/Eastern
  • Admission fee ?


  Speakers

Dr Dennis Silage

Topic:

What’s All This Software Defined Radio Stuff, Anyhow?

The software defined radio (SDR) is the modern evolution of the hardware approach to radio communications that had dominated recent technology. Discrete components formerly implemented tuned circuits, amplifiers, oscillators, mixers and detectors to provide analog modulation and demodulation. Even though vacuum tube electronics gave way to transistors and integrated circuits, the components of the radio remained discrete. However, the advent of digital modulation and application specific integrated circuits has resulted in an SDR in which all but the front end of the receiver and the back end of the transmitter could be accomplished with digital signal processing software.

This talk will discuss the progression of the configuration and the availability of inexpensive SDRs that, while only capable of reception, can still provide a technical advocation and enhance STEM outreach. More modest SDRs with improved performance can facilitate such advanced applications as the reception of commercial and amateur radio satellites

Biography:

Dr. Dennis Silage received the PhD in Electrical Engineering from the University of Pennsylvania. He had been a Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Temple University, teaching digital data communication, digital signal and image processing and embedded processing systems. He is now Professor Emeritus but continues to develop high performance, real-time computational applications using field programmable gate arrays and system-on-chip devices. Dr. Silage is a recipient of  the National Outstanding Teaching Award of the American Society for Engineering Education, the Lindback Distinguished Teaching Award and the IEEE Philadelphia Section Benjamin Franklin Key Award. He is a Life Senior Member of the IEEE.





Agenda

WEBINAR: 7:00 - 8:00 P.M. 

The Zoom Webinar link and password will be forwarded to all registered participants after Noon on the day of the meeting. Check your spam folder if you don't see the email. 

Webinar is open to all.

PDH certificates are available and an evaluation form will be emailed to you after the meeting. PDH certificate are sent by IEEE USA 3-4 weeks after the meeting.