Space Exploration: EMI/EMC Problems/Solutions NASA ~ Past/Present/Future Missions “Orion” Mars/Moon Spacecraft

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IEEE Southeastern Michigan: Chapter VIII (EMC)


Southeastern Michigan IEEE EMC Chapter technical meeting.

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Rohde & Schwarz

Note: The parking lot near the North building is currently under construction.  The only thing this really affects is the access road off of Auto Club Drive (which is the driveway closest to the North building).  That driveway is totally closed and there is a sign directing people to enter off Hubbard Dr.  

 

 



  Date and Time

  Location

  Contact

  Registration


  • 19000 Hubbard Drive
  • Dearborn, Michigan
  • United States 48126
  • Building: University of Michigan - Dearborn Fairlane Center North
  • Room Number: Room 110
  • Click here for Map

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  • Registration closed


  Speakers

John Norgard

John Norgard of NASA/JSC

Topic:

Space Exploration: EMI/EMC Problems/Solutions NASA ~ Past/Present/Future Missions “Orion” Mars/Moon Spacecraft

Abstract

This paper is about space exploration and presents an overview of NASA’s past/present/future missions, with an emphasis on EMI problems and EMC solutions.  The past mission of NASA was to design and build the Space Shuttle (SS), which was used to build the International Space Station (ISS).  The present mission of  NASA is to support the ISS with new equipment, supplies, and crew changes.  The future mission of NASA is to design/analyze a new blunt-body re-entry vehicle to replace the decommissioned SS for a crew exploration vehicle to operate past the orbit of the ISS, and to eventually fly to the Moon and Mars.

Part I:  NASA’s PAST/PRESENT/FUTURE MISSIONS

This paper presents an overview of space exploration and NASA’s past/present/future missions, with an emphasis on EMI problems and EMC solutions.  In the past, the mission of NASA was to design and build the Space Shuttle (SS), which was used to build the International Space Station (ISS).  Presently, NASA supports the ISS with new equipment, experiments, supplies, and crew.  After the SS was decommissioned, NASA has been designing/analyzing a new blunt-body re-entry vehicle for a crew exploration vehicle to operate past the orbit of the ISS, and to eventually fly to the Moon and Mars.

MOON/MARS

NASA plans to first return to the Moon, build a lunar habitat there, and to learn to live in space.  Later NASA will mine the moon’s materials and build a spacecraft that will lift off in the reduced gravity of the Moon and then fly to Mars and establish a Martin habitat on that planet.  A new plasma rocket engine is being developed and tested to significantly reduce the present 9 month transient time from the Moon to Mars.

Part II: DESIGN/ANALYSIS/TESTING EXAMPLES

CEM codes are being used to model & simulate (M&S) the new spacecraft design and to analyze the radiated and conducted emissions from the spacecraft and the radiated and conducted immunity (susceptibility/vulnerability) of the electronic components in the spacecraft to ensure safety of flight.  A prototype Mars/Moon spacecraft called “Orion” is being designed, built, analyzed, and tested for compliance to military/government EMC standards.  Hybrid codes are being developed to numerically evaluate the unique Radiation Integrals for the fields, subject to the Boundary Conditions on the surface of the capsule.

PARACHUTE RE-ENTRY DROP TESTS

The Orion spacecraft, built for future NASA manned deep-space exploration of the Moon and Mars, is a blunt body re-entry capsule, composed of a crew exploration module and a service module, with a parachute decent for re-entry back to Earth.  NASA is currently testing the Orion’s Capsule Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) for staged parachute re-entry into the Earth’s atmosphere after a mission past the ISS and return to Earth.  High-altitude aircraft drop tests of the parachute re-entry system are being conducted at the Yuma Proving Ground (YPG) to provide measurements of position, velocity, acceleration, attitude, temperature, pressure, humidity, and parachute loads.  The avionics system on CPAS also provides firing events to deploy and release staged/reefed parachutes using mortars and pressure cartridge assemblies, which must be immune to EMI effects.

 EMI/EMC TEST/ANALYSIS

Intentional and unintentional radiation emitted and received by antennas and electronic components on/in the capsule are being tested for radiated emissions/immunity.  The unshielded components of the capsule are being tested at NASA/JSC; the shielded system is being built-up and integrated at YPG.  To verify and validate (V&V) the radiation levels predicted by the CEM codes, EMI measurements of the radiated fields are being made around the Orion capsule.

 CONCLUSIONS

In this presentation, pictures of the test setups, capsule build-up and development, parachute drop tests, and test results for the components and assembled system are shown as an example of typical EMI tests being performed on the Orion spacecraft.

Biography:

Biography

 

John Norgard

NASA/JSC

 

John Norgard received the BSEE degree from Georgia Tech and MS and PhD degrees in Applied Physics from Caltech.

Before coming to NASA/JSC as the Chief Engineer for Electromagnetic Environmental Effects (E3), Dr. Norgard was a Professor at the University of Colorado, and was the Chief Scientist at the Rome Research Site of the ARFL.  He was a Distinguished Visiting Professor at the US Air Force Academy, a Visiting Professor at the Tel-Aviv University, and a member of the Technical Staff of the Bell Telephone Laboratories.

Prof Norgard was the Dean of the EAS College, Chair of the MAE and ECE Departments at the University of Colorado.  He was a Professor in the ECE Department at Georgia Tech and a Post-Doctoral Fellow at the Norwegian Defense Research Establishment in Oslo, Norway

He worked at NASA/JPL while studying at Caltech, and was a Co-Op student at Georgia Tech while working at the Charleston Naval Shipyard and Polaris Submarine Base.

Dr Norgard is a Fellow of IEEE, and on the Board of Directors of the EMC Society and ACES.

Email:

Address:Houston, Texas, United States

John Norgard of NASA/JSC

Topic:

Space Exploration: EMI/EMC Problems/Solutions NASA ~ Past/Present/Future Missions “Orion” Mars/Moon Spacecraft

Biography:

Email:

Address:Houston, Texas, United States





Chapter website: http://www.emcsociety.org

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