Molding Electromagnetic Waves Using Natural and Engineered Media

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The local science and engineering community and the general public are invited to join us for Molding Electromagnetic Waves Using Natural and Engineered Media, one of five public lectures to be held at noon during IEEE APS/URSI 2015 at the Westin Bayshore Conference Centre from 20-24 July 2015.

Admission is free of charge but pre-registration is required. Before and after the lecture, guests are invited to visit the exhibits that will be set up in the foyer outside the lecture hall. 



  Date and Time

  Location

  Contact

  Registration


  • 1601 Bayshore Drive
  • Vancouver, British Columbia
  • Canada V6G 2V4
  • Building: Westin Bayshore Conference Centre
  • Room Number: Grand Ballroom, Salon E

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  • Prof. Dave Michelson, General Co-Chair IEEE APS/URSI 2015

  • Registration closed


  Speakers

Nader Engheta

Nader Engheta of University of Pennsylvania

Topic:

Molding Electromagnetic Waves Using Natural and Engineered Media

One of the efficient ways to control and tame electromagnetic fields and waves is by materials. Through the past many decades, scientists and engineers have offered ideas for using materials, both “natural” as well as “engineered” media, to exploit such controls over the waves in order to design functional devices and components. With the advent of science of the nanometer scales and the state-of-the-art nanofabrication, in recent years it has become possible to construct structures much smaller than the wavelengths of visible lights, thus ushering a vast amount of unprecedented possibilities and novel opportunities for nanoscale functional structures. Metamaterials and nanomaterials are now made with the atomic precision, and this provides ample opportunities for molding the fields and waves at the nanoscale with desired functionalities at will. At such subwavelength scales, quantum aspects of light-matter interaction need to be taken into account, and thus quantum electrodynamical features of nanomaterials, exploited towards future quantum engineering devices, become a fertile field to be explored. In this talk, we will give an overview of how over the years, and particularly in recent years, materials have played important roles in molding the fields and waves, and will forecast some of the future possibilities for the years to come.

Biography:

Nader Engheta is the H. Nedwill Ramsey Professor at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, with affiliations in the Departments of Electrical and Systems Engineering, Physics and Astronomy, Bioengineering, and Materials Science and Engineering. He received his B.S. degree from the University of Tehran, and his M.S and Ph.D. degrees from Caltech. Selected as one of the Scientific American Magazine 50 Leaders in Science and Technology in 2006 for developing the concept of optical lumped nanocircuits, he is a Guggenheim Fellow, an IEEE Third Millennium Medalist, a Fellow of IEEE, American Physical Society (APS), Optical Society of America (OSA), American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), SPIE, and Materials Research Society (MRS).

Nader Engheta of University of Pennsylvania

Topic:

Molding Electromagnetic Waves Using Natural and Engineered Media

Biography:





Agenda

11:30-11:50 (flexible) - Check in at registration and visit the exhibits in the Ballroom Foyer

11:50 - 12:30 - Attend the lecture in Salon E of the Grand Ballroom

12:30 - 13:30 (flexible) - Visit the exhibits in the Ballroom Foyer