Sesquicentennial Year of Maxwell’s Equations and Electromagnetics

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The local science and engineering community and the general public are invited to join us for Sesquicentennial Year of Maxwell’s Equations and Electromagnetics, one of five public lectures to be held at noon during IEEE APS/URSI 2015 at the Westin Bayshore Conference Centre from 20-24 July 2015.

Admission is free of charge but pre-registration is required. 



  Date and Time

  Location

  Contact

  Registration


  • 1601 Bayshore Drive
  • Vancouver, British Columbia
  • Canada V6G 2V4
  • Building: Westin Bayshore Conference Centre
  • Room Number: Grand Ballroom, Salon E

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  • Prof. Dave Michelson, General Co-Chair IEEE APS/URSI 2015

  • Registration closed


  Speakers

W.C. Chew

W.C. Chew of University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

Topic:

Sesquicentennial Year of Maxwell’s Equations and Electromagnetics

At the 150th year of Maxwell’s equations, they continue to be impactful. Electromagnetics and Maxwell’s equations have been instrumental in the conception of many electrical engineering and optical technologies. It the beginning, it was telegraphy, and rotating machineries. Over the years, Maxwell’s equations have given rise to wireless communications, antennas, radar, masers, optics, and photonics. The amazing feature of Maxwell’s equations is that they are valid from subatomic length scale to galactic length scale. They are also valid over a vast frequency range where the wavelength could be very long as well as being very short. Furthermore, they are also valid in classical electromagnetics as well as in quantum electromagnetics. The validity of electromagnetic theory has been tested at many different length scales in several parts per billion. As a result, electromagnetic theory has impacted a whole sleuth of technologies in electrical engineering, optics, photonics, as well as in material science. Because of the highly predictive value of Maxwell’s equations, there has been always a quest for their accurate solutions. Various methods to solve Maxwell’s equations have been developed since the dawn of their discovery. With the advent of computers, the need for more accurate and robust solutions does not diminish, but indeed increases. These accurate solution providers work in synergy with designers and experimenters to develop new technologies. We will also discuss future directions in this area.

Biography:

Prof. Chew's research area is computational electromagnetics and fast computational algorithms for solving electromagnetic scattering and multiphysics problems. His recent research interest is in adding modern physics and multi-physics concepts to computational works. This includes developing models for solar cells, nano-electronics, quantum transport, and Casimir force. He also studies computational methods to solve the multi-scale problem in computer chip and circuit design.  Prof. Chew is a Fellow of IEEE, OSA, IOP, and HKIE. He was named an NSF Presidential Young Investigator in 1986. Previously, he was the director of the Center for Computational Electromagnetics and the Electromagnetics Laboratory. He was a Founder Professor (2000-2005) of Engineering, YT Lo Chair Professor (2005-2010) of Electrical and Computer Engineering. More recently (2013), he was named the George and Ann Fisher Distinguished Professor of Engineering.

W.C. Chew of University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

Topic:

Sesquicentennial Year of Maxwell’s Equations and Electromagnetics

Biography:





Agenda

11:30-11:50 (flexible) - Check in at registration

11:50 - 12:30 - Attend the lecture in Salon E of the Grand Ballroom