Smartphone Biosensors: Lab-in-a-Pocket Diagnostics

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Since their introduction in 1997, “smart” mobile phones with internet connectivity, high resolution cameras, touch-screen displays, and powerful CPUs have gained rapid market acceptance driven by a combination of falling prices and increasingly sophisticated features. In addition, there is a growing ecosystem of applications that take advantage of the phone’s sensors, display, and connection to powerful computing and data storage capabilities that are available in the “cloud.” The built-in capabilities of smartphones can be further extended through the addition of accessories that enable the phone to sense different types of information. Incorporation of biosensing into mobile platforms is a potentially powerful development, as biological assay capabilities that have previously only been available through expensive laboratory-based instruments may be utilized by anyone. Such developments may help to facilitate the goal of “personalized medicine” in which home-based tests may be used to diagnose a medical condition, but with a system that automatically communicates results to a cloud-based monitoring system that alerts the physician when warranted. Low-cost portable biosensor systems integrated with mobile devices may also enable diagnostic technology that can be translated to resource-poor regions of the world for pathogen detection, disease diagnosis, and monitoring of nutritional status. Such systems, deployed widely, would be capable of rapidly monitoring for the presence of environmental contaminants over large areas, or tracking the development of a medical condition throughout a large population. This talk will summarize recent developments in the Cunningham Group at Illinois in the utilization of integrated smartphone cameras as a high resolution spectrophotometer that is capable of measuring ELISA assays, label-free photonic crystal biosensor assays, thin film chromatography, and fluorescence spectroscopy. Utilizing special purpose, low-cost cradles for common smartphones and plastic microfluidic devices for facilitating liquid-handling tasks, we have demonstrated detection of cancer biomarkers, food allergens, pathogen DNA, organic contamination of beverage dispensing lines, and fraudulent drugs – with performance that rivals results obtained with conventional laboratory instruments. Current efforts are aimed at developing a smartphone-based multimode (ELISA, FRET, FP, and Photonic Crystal) detection instrument that can perform the functions of several laboratory-based tools.



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  • 208 N. Wright
  • Urbana, Illinois
  • United States 61801
  • Building: Micro and Nano Technology Lab
  • Room Number: 1000
  • Click here for Map

Staticmap?size=250x200&sensor=false&zoom=14&markers=40.1139564%2c 88
  • Starts 27 August 2015 08:25 PM
  • Ends 23 September 2015 12:00 PM
  • All times are US/Central
  • No Admission Charge
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  Speakers

Brian Cunningham

Brian Cunningham

Topic:

Smartphone Biosensors: Lab-in-a-Pocket Diagnostics

Biography:

Brian T. Cunningham is a Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and the Department of Bioengineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where he also serves as the Director of the Micro and Nanotechnology Laboratory, and as Director of the NSF Center Innovative Instrumentation Technology (CIIT). He holds the Donald Biggar Willett Professorship of Engineering. His research is in the development of biosensors and detection instruments for pharmaceutical high throughput screening, disease diagnostics, point-of-care testing, life science research, and environmental monitoring. He has published 125 peer-reviewed journal articles, and is an inventor on 75 issued US patents. Prior to joining the faculty of Illinois in 2004, Prof. Cunningham was a co-founder of SRU Biosystems in 2000. He founded Exalt Diagnostics in 2012 to commercialize photonic crystal enhanced fluorescence technology for disease biomarker detection. Acoustic MEMS biosensor technology that he developed in his early career at Draper Laboratory has been licensed and commercialized by Bioscale, Inc. for applications in pathogen detection and diagnostics. Prof Cunningham’s work has recently been recognized with the IEEE Sensors Council Technical Achievement Award for the invention, development, and commercialization of sensors based upon photonic crystals. He is a Fellow of IEEE, OSA, AIMBE, and is a member of the National Academy of Inventors. Additional information on his research can be found on his web site: http://nano.ece.illinois.edu.

Brian Cunningham

Topic:

Smartphone Biosensors: Lab-in-a-Pocket Diagnostics

Biography:





Agenda

Meeting Agenda:

* 6:00 - 6:15 pm - Convene, Pizza

* 6:15 - 6:45 pm - Lecture

* 6:45 - 7:00 pm - Q&A

* 7:00 - 7:30 pm - Networking