Thermal Infrared Hyperspectral Imaging: Instrumentation and Applications

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Applications in several fields including defense and security, environment and geology require sensors with state-of-the-art sensitivity and capabilities. Among these sensors, the imaging spectrometer is a remote sensing instrument providing a large amount of rich information about the measured scene. The thermal infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum hosts the fingerprint signature of many molecules of interest for these applications. Moreover, this spectral region is where is located the peak intensity of the self-emission of any objects at room temperature. This presentation introduces the principle of passive remote sensing in the thermal infrared region using the spectroscopy as the basic physics principle. We present the imaging FTS from the instrumentation point of view, including the data processing portion. Measurement examples will be presented for both ground-based and airborne configurations. Applications covered include gas detection and identification, mineral mapping and methane leak measurement.



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  • Center for Imaging Science
  • 54 Lomb Memorial Drive
  • Rochester, New York
  • United States 14623
  • Building: CIS-76
  • Room Number: 1125
  • Click here for Map

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  Speakers

Martin Chamberland

Martin Chamberland of Telops, Inc

Topic:

Thermal Infrared Hyperspectral Imaging: Instrumentation and Applications

Applications in several fields including defense and security, environment and geology require sensors with state-of-the-art sensitivity and capabilities. Among these sensors, the imaging spectrometer is a remote sensing instrument providing a large amount of rich information about the measured scene. The thermal infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum hosts the fingerprint signature of many molecules of interest for these applications. Moreover, this spectral region is where is located the peak intensity of the self-emission of any objects at room temperature. This presentation introduces the principle of passive remote sensing in the thermal infrared region using the spectroscopy as the basic physics principle. We present the imaging FTS from the instrumentation point of view, including the data processing portion. Measurement examples will be presented for both ground-based and airborne configurations. Applications covered include gas detection and identification, mineral mapping and methane leak measurement.

Biography:

Martin Chamberland is vice-president technology and co-founder of Telops inc. He received his Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from université Laval in Quebec City in 1995. He received also from université Laval a B.Sc. in 1987 and a M.Sc. in 1991, all in electrical engineering. Before co-founding Telops in 2000, Martin worked for 6 years at Bomem as a systems engineer for the development of various FTIR-based remote sensing spectro-radiometers for ground, airborne and spaceborne applications. At Telops, Martin lead the development of the HyperCam, a thermal infrared hyperspectral imager and he has been the product line manager for this product. In addition to keep the Hyper-Cam at the state-of-the-art from a technological point of view, Martin works the development of applications with this instrument. Telops has since become a worldwide leader in the manufacturing of infrared cameras and hyperspectral imaging systems.

Martin Chamberland of Telops, Inc

Topic:

Thermal Infrared Hyperspectral Imaging: Instrumentation and Applications

Biography: